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Dividing Decimals Examples


Dividing decimal numbers in Math is similar to dividing whole numbers, one just has to pay attention to the position of the decimal point when dealing with dividing decimals examples.




Dividing by a Power of 10:

When dividing a decimal number by  10  or a power of  10  such as  100  or  1000,  the process follows a pattern which keeps things fairly simple.

How large the power of  10  dividing is, decides how many places to the left that the decimal point moves, resulting in the solution.


Dividing by  10:     Decimal point moves  1  place to the left.

Dividing by  100:     Decimal point moves  2  places to the left.

Dividing by  1000:     Decimal point moves  3  places to the left.

And so on.



Examples    


(1.1) 
3.4 ÷ 10  =  0.34

(1.2) 
2.5 ÷ 1000  =  0.025

(1.3) 
0.6 ÷ 100  =  0.006

(1.4) 
0.082 ÷ 10’000  =  0.0000082

(1.5) 
0.409 ÷ 1000  =  0.000409






Dividing Decimals Examples,
Dividing by other Numbers


When you want to do a division sum such as   7.66 ÷ 3.

This can be dealt with like it was   766 ÷ 3,
care just has to be taken with where the decimal point goes in proceedings.



Examples    


(2.1) 

7.86  ÷  6

Solution   

First step is to set up as a normal division sum.

6 7.86

Next we place a decimal point in the position where the answer will be, directly above the place of the decimal point in the dividend part.
      .
6 7.86

Now from here it’s just standard division as normal.

    1. 31
6 7.186       ,     7.86  ÷  6  =  1.31




(2.2) 

13.86 ÷ 3

Solution   

3 13.86

        .
3 13.86

    04. 62
3 13.186
      ,     18.33  ÷  3  =   6.11







Dividing by a Decimal Number


When you want to divide by a decimal number, it’s handy to change the decimal number that you’re dividing by to a whole number.

This can be done with multiplication, though both numbers in the sum must be multiplied by the same number.

An example of a sum with decimal division is
6 ÷ 0.4.

Multiplying both numbers in the sum by  10  won’t change the overall sum itself,
but it does change the sum appearance.

Changing it to    60 ÷ 4,   which can be worked out as  15.

So   6 ÷ 0.4  =  15.



Example    


(3.1) 

392 ÷ 1.4

Solution   

We can look to change  1.4  to a whole number, which can be done by multiplying both numbers in the sum by  10.

1.4 × 10  =  140
392 × 10  =  3920

We now have   3920 ÷ 14.
Which we can solve by standard Short Division.

       02  80
14 391120

We have an answer of  280.

392 ÷ 1.4  =  280





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